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Wednesday, May 04, 2005

Sunspots 7

Tabletalk: Christianity and Culture has been posting on the Narnia books, and does lots of Lewis work.

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A first-term missionary to Russia, with a wife and baby, has started a blog, and is posting about every other day or so. So far, he has written about being asked to arrange a marriage, how Russians and US Southerners dress for the cold (it isn't what you might think), global missions strategy, what Russians think of Stalin, and other things. (Full disclosure: he's our nephew)

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The New Yorker has a wonderful factual article, "Capturing the Unicorn," about trying to create accurate digital images of the Unicorn Tapestries. The article involves art, computing, digital photography, history, medieval religion, and human interest. The leading characters are two brothers who prefer to be known as one single mathematician. (Warning: this is a full-length article, longer than a post, even longer than my posts)

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A seminary student has posted a draft (or maybe the final version) of a term paper, on "The Arts and the Church." (Warning: this is a full-length paper, longer than a post, even longer than my posts)

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Web pages on the Causes of Colors (I posted a series, beginning with Red on Valentine's Day, and ending with Black.)

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Joe Carter gets seriously theological, in a post (first of more than one) explaining what "free will" means.

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Spiked survey, "If you could teach the world just one thing," of 250 scientists. Sample response, by Paul Davies: The essence of the scientific method is that there is an actually existing world out there, which is ordered in an intelligible way. The job of the scientist is to describe that order, in the best possible manner. Science is not about right and wrong, about truth, or even about reality. It is about providing reliable descriptions of the world that enable us to make new discoveries.

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Orson Scott Card, no less, is not sorry that "Star Trek" is ending.

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The Boston Globe has a review of an new book by Michael Ruse, one of the very few important philosophers who write about science. Ruse, no Christian, and a convinced believer in naturalistic evolution, claims that Richard Dawkins and Edward O. Wilson, among others, are making worldview claims not supported by science, and polarizing the discussion about origins unnecessarily. (See previous mention of Dawkins in this blog)

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Bonnie writes about the issues of how we deal with the aged, in a poignant and personal way, yet deals with the issues themselves, in a typically (for her) good post.

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This week's Christian Carnival is here.

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