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Tuesday, January 14, 2014

On divine healing -- My father's words, 1943

My father worked on the Alcan Highway during World War II. One of my brothers has been scanning the letters he sent my mother during that time, and I am most grateful.

On October 1, 1943, he was responding to my mother, who had stayed behind in Wisconsin with me and my two next brothers. She had apparently had an eye problem, and gone to a doctor about it, but wondered if she should have just trusted in God for divine healing.

Here's what my Dad said: 
You say it seems incongruous to believe in the power of God to heal and yet go to a physician. Why? Has not God seen fit to endow that [doctor's name] with the knowledge and power to heal eyes? Isn't it possible, though far fetched, that his only mission in life was to heal your eye under God's direction? We both know that God has the power to heal directly and does heal that way, yet Christ saw fit to use clay and spittle on the blind eyes so that that person would have something to pin his faith to. Perhaps it is better expressed thus: The clay and spittle were not necessary and Christ had no belief in them, but the blind man believed in them, therefore Christ used them. Of course this is just an idea and my reasoning may be faulty. [The Biblical events Dad referred to are found in John 9.]

Thanks for reading!

Here's a post, in this blog, on a similar subject, but there's not much overlap.

2 comments:

Weekend Fisher said...

I like the way he put that: "Christ had no belief in them, but the blind man believe in them, therefore Christ used them."

He sounds like a thoughtful and humble man. I look forward to meeting him some day.

Take care & God bless
Anne / WF

Martin LaBar said...

Thanks, Weekend Fisher. He did some good thinking. Like all of us, it wasn't always good, I guess.

If you meet him, it won't be in this life, but I hope that you do.