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Sunday, October 22, 2017

Impressions, by Martin Wells Knapp, 71

In a previous excerpt, Knapp stated that there are four features of "impressions" from God. These are Scriptural; Right (consistent with good morals); Providential (in harmony with God's will); and Reasonable. His discussion of the result of living by "Convictions from Above," according to Christ's example, continues:

He was Glorified. A little while in the crucible of trial, and then an eternity of infinite glory! A brief, stormy voyage on the rough sea of Human Life, and then forever in the heavenly haven with the countless multitudes whom He has rescued! To Him death was simply "glorification," and through Him it likewise is to all who follow fully in His steps. If true to Him we "shall never see death," but, like Him, when our work here is done, we shall be "GLORIFIED" -- hallelujah!

In Him then we see the perfect manhood which results from His indwelling in human hearts, and the blessed life of trial and victory which comes to those who are controlled by "convictions from
above."

In Jesus, "Man's Perfect Model," we see with clear vision the steps our humanity must take to meet the end for which it was created.

(a). Humanity obedient -- Jesus doing the Father's will.

(b). Humanity tempted -- Jesus and the temptation.

(c). Humanity humbled -- Jesus suffering for the salvation of others.

(d). Humanity triumphant -- Jesus and the resurrection.

(e). Humanity exalted -- Jesus ascending to the right hand of the Father.

These are the steps in which we are to follow our illustrious Leader to our prepared place above.


Excerpted from Impressions, by Martin Wells Knapp. Original publication date, 1892. Public domain. My source is here. The previous post in the series is here.

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